Location

Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

Event Website

https://pacrim.coe.hawaii.edu

Start Date

3-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

3-2020 12:00 AM

Description

Information accessibility for persons with visual disabilities is the transformation into text data, braille or speech format. For persons with hearing disabilities, information accessibility includes closed-captioning, notetaking, and sign language translation services. Although such methods are standard and essential, this paper will discuss possible differences in comprehensibility between these various formats. We designed a research project, ‘Reasonable Accommodations of Reading Accessibility (RARA),’ to evaluate the consistency of academic quality in braille, sign language, and speech formats. First, we will focus on the features of the Japanese language, because these features could possibly affect the differences in the understanding among each means of conveying. Second, we introduce two concepts, Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), as key factors in our research project. Third, we will discuss the outcomes of interviews from 2018 that targeted each two users of braille and of sign language. The outcomes suggested mainly about unique ways of understanding content in various means of transmission. Finally, we will outline the present phase of the RARA project.

Comments

Yoshimi Matsuzaki, Ph.D., is an associate lecturer at Tsuda University, specializing in social epidemiology of youth with special emphasis on mental health. She received her doctorate from Tsuda University in 2018 and has begun research for reasonable accommodation of reading accessibility (RARA), that aims to examine and consider better accommodation to learn and understand reading material deeper. Employed at the Inclusive Education Support (IES) Division she was a teaching assistant from 2015 to 2016, and community coordinator since 2017. Matsuzaki’s role in IES is to connect actors in communities and make opportunities of co-working.

Wakaba Hamamatsu is a graduate student at Tsuda University. She majors in disability studies. When she was an undergraduate student, she learned how media and technology influenced the support for people with disabilities. She practiced it through “scene description” for students with visual disability as a volunteer staff in inclusive education support (IES). Since this April, she has been employed by IES as a teaching assistant and held several events and workshops regarding reasonable accommodation. Her main research interest is how to improve the situation of employment of people with disabilities in Japan.

Kuniomi Shibata, Ph.D., is an associate professor at Tsuda University and specializes in assistive technology, especially focusing on information technology for persons with disabilities. Currently, he is in charge of support programs for students with disabilities.

Author Note: This research was supported in part by grants from the FY2018 Private University Research Branding Project (Type B: Global Development Category) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, also, JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15KK0132. Correspondence concerning this proceeding should be addressed to Yoshimi Matsuzaki, and Kuniomi Shibata, Department of International & Cultural Studies, Tsuda University, 2-1-1 Tsuda-machi, Kodaira-shi, Tokyo 187-8577 Japan. E-mail: mtzyoshi@tsuda.ac.jp, kshibata@tsuda.ac.jp.

This article is brought to you for free and open access by the Center on Disability Studies, ISSN 2641-6115. Licensed under CC BY 4.0.

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Mar 1st, 12:00 AM Mar 1st, 12:00 AM

Reasonable Accommodation and Information Accessibility by Various Formats the Difference Between Braille, Sign Language, and Speech Format

Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

Information accessibility for persons with visual disabilities is the transformation into text data, braille or speech format. For persons with hearing disabilities, information accessibility includes closed-captioning, notetaking, and sign language translation services. Although such methods are standard and essential, this paper will discuss possible differences in comprehensibility between these various formats. We designed a research project, ‘Reasonable Accommodations of Reading Accessibility (RARA),’ to evaluate the consistency of academic quality in braille, sign language, and speech formats. First, we will focus on the features of the Japanese language, because these features could possibly affect the differences in the understanding among each means of conveying. Second, we introduce two concepts, Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), as key factors in our research project. Third, we will discuss the outcomes of interviews from 2018 that targeted each two users of braille and of sign language. The outcomes suggested mainly about unique ways of understanding content in various means of transmission. Finally, we will outline the present phase of the RARA project.

https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/pacrim/2020/Articles/11