Location

Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

Event Website

https://pacrim.coe.hawaii.edu

Start Date

3-2020 12:00 AM

End Date

3-2020 12:00 AM

Description

There is much talk of intersectionality within critical studies in academia, and yet there continues to be a significant disconnect between discourse and practice in this respect on campuses. In 2016, the #disabilitytoowhite movement brought attention to the pressing lack of focus on intersectionality within the Disability movement. It created debate, gave rise to emotion and offered hope that the Disability movement, and more particularly disability service provision, advocacy and scholarship within academia, might take notice and address this gap. Almost four years on, the sad observation has to be that little has changed. The author first examines his experience as accessibility consultant within higher education to explore the tension that exist with regards to race in higher ed disability service provision, and examines the hope that #disabilitytoowhite offered a change. The second part of the paper explores specific current areas of concerns. The third section offers suggestions that might enable accessibility services to address this tension and to shift practices in order to embed intersectionality in service provision.

Comments

Frederic Fovet, Ph.D., is an associate professor within the School of Education and Technology at RRU. His practice and research portfolio focus on learners with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties (SEBD). He has been a teacher and principal for some-15-years. Over the duration of his PhD Frederic took on the position of director of the Office for Students with Disabilities at McGill; during this period, he gained a solid grounding in disability studies. He was responsible for cross-campus efforts to develop Universal Design for Learning at McGill, and has been program chair of the three first Pan-Canadian Conferences on UDL.

This article is brought to you for free and open access by the Center on Disability Studies, ISSN 2641-6115. Licensed under CC BY 4.0.

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Mar 1st, 12:00 AM Mar 1st, 12:00 AM

Examining the (Lack of) Impact the #Disabilitytoowhite Movement has had on Higher Ed Disability Service Provision

Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

There is much talk of intersectionality within critical studies in academia, and yet there continues to be a significant disconnect between discourse and practice in this respect on campuses. In 2016, the #disabilitytoowhite movement brought attention to the pressing lack of focus on intersectionality within the Disability movement. It created debate, gave rise to emotion and offered hope that the Disability movement, and more particularly disability service provision, advocacy and scholarship within academia, might take notice and address this gap. Almost four years on, the sad observation has to be that little has changed. The author first examines his experience as accessibility consultant within higher education to explore the tension that exist with regards to race in higher ed disability service provision, and examines the hope that #disabilitytoowhite offered a change. The second part of the paper explores specific current areas of concerns. The third section offers suggestions that might enable accessibility services to address this tension and to shift practices in order to embed intersectionality in service provision.

https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/pacrim/2020/Articles/3